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INfrastruWctAERTure Thames in Kent. Currently a grazing marsh, the required ecological and archaeological works have been carried out in preparation for the ground investigations to begin next year. This site has required involvement with the local community of Cooling village to ensure that little disruption is caused during the works. In addition, relationships have been developed with the current graziers in order to minimise the impact of the works on their management regimes. Site X has been particularly controversial as it is already perceived as a beautiful location, inhabited with many species of birds, including game used for hunting, and water voles. However, following an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) it was concluded that the site adds little ecological value and that an intertidal mudflat would enhance the biodiversity within the area. Water vole trapping in Site X Remediation As the site was heavily contaminated a remediation strategy was put in place to prepare the site for commercial use. Extensive investigations were carried out across the site to determine the amount and type of contamination. Not surprisingly, considering the sites history, the vast majority of the contamination was hydrocarbon-based. A remediation compound was set up to receive contaminated material on site. This significantly reduced the cost and carbon footprint of the remediation process. Approximately 100 000 tonnes of contaminated material and over seven million litres of water have been treated to date. A contractor has been employed to manage the compound, and monitor the 6 remediation process. Once the materials have been remediated to set standards agreed with the Environment Agency they are returned to the site, closing the loop so that no material is wasted. The remediated water is used for dust suppression and vehicle washing. It is estimated that the remediation process has saved about £12.6m with a 99.9 per cent reduction in waste. Remediation processes in action Archaeology Specialist archaeological consultants were contracted to investigate the industrial heritage of the site. Historic maps and nonintrusive surveys have been used to identify and map any important archaeology. The investigations were carried out across the site and on both Stanford Wharf Nature Reserve and Site X. One of the most significant finds was the discovery and conservation of the UK’s largest intact roman salt mill. All findings from the excavations have been recorded and will be kept for future reference, including a number of publications available to the public. An Archaeological Mitigation Strategy has been put into place to control the impact of the development of the logistics park on archaeological features and cultural heritage. Local development order Original planning consent for the logistics park was granted under an outline planning consent. However, this system was proving to be very complicated and would be costly for both London Gateway and the local authority (LA) to implement. So in 2011 the LA resolved to pursue a Local Development Order (LDO) for the park. In order to adopt an LDO both an EIA and a Habitats Regulation Assessment had to be carried out to assess the impact of the development on the local environment and communities. The development will be controlled by the LA using four compliance documents, a Code of Construction Practice, a Design Code, Ecological Mitigation and Management Plan, and the Travel Plan. The logistics park will be built on demand over a 10 year period. So, the LDO offers a certain amount of flexibility to future occupiers to suit changing demands. The LDO will significantly reduce the amount of time spent on processing planning permissions, and lowering the costs. Having the LDO provides a degree of certainty for future occupiers that they will be able to build what they want, within the limits of the compliance documents adding an attractive value to the plots. BREEAM The LDO has a requirement that all buildings within the logistics park are at least ‘very good’ by BREEAM standards by 2016. A lot of the work that has already been carried out, for example ecological translocation and archaeological investigations, can contribute towards gaining BREEAM credits. The aim is to be awarded with site wide credits for these works so that new occupiers already have a number of BREEAM credits before they even put a spade in the ground. CIRIA seeks to update Archaeology and development (C672) guidance and would welcome industry feedback and involvement to identify views on the standing and uptake of the guide, and areas that require updating. Archaeological excavation of Roman salt mill


evolutionwinter2013
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