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CONSTRUCTION 2025 THE ROAD TO PROGRESS Leaders from across the industry came together on 27 April 2015 to explore the industry’s progress towards the vision for 2025. The CIRIA Network event Future of construction; progress towards Construction 2025, provided a forum for a range of members to hear first-hand from those leading in key areas including, Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA), BIM, procurement, low carbon technologies, lean construction and the UK engineering research landscape. With speakers representing the construction sphere from clients to contractors and consultants, the event show-cased a wealth of insight into the approaches being taken to meet the government’s vision and the industry’s application of key methodologies. The overarching message from the speakers and audience was that despite the significant challenges presented by the ambitious targets set out in the strategy, the construction industry is confident about the opportunities presented by it. The benefits of increasing cross-sector integration and collaboration, embedding sustainable construction processes throughout supply chains and improving knowledge sharing, are recognised and being realised in order to drive growth and confidence across the sector. More detail and insight from each of the speakers is outlined separately here. Collaboration is central to building capacity and CIRIA will continue to bring the industry together to provide insight to new and emerging developments, present opportunities to pinpoint solutions and deliver good practice, which drives improvement. Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA) Alan Clucas, Director of Explore Manufacturing, Laing O’Rourke Group outlined Laing O’Rourke’s Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA) strategy and Digital Engineering (DE) innovation 16 Ruth Hynes, CIRIA Network Manager highlights key presentations from a recent CIRIA Network event exploring the impact of Construction 2025 on the construction industry Developing an industry-wide DfMA development strategy goes hand-in-hand with meeting the targets set out in the Government’s 2025 industrial strategy for construction. DE provides multiple benefits, which include visualise an end product, effectively interrogate and co-ordinate the design process, enable rapid cost evaluations of construction methods, appraise constructability, improve the study of logistical plans, and achieve optimisation of the construction schedule. While the development of DfMA was initially driven by clients’ demands including defect-free products, increased quality, incident and injury-free construction methods, and reduced operating costs (TOTEX), Laing O’Rourke also recognised that by developing a more skilled workforce in digital engineering the company would be capable of meeting the demands of a rapidly changing world. Embracing DfMA and developing a skilled workforce in this area will provide the potential for another string export market. Moving towards BIM level 3 – innovation and new technologies David Philp, Head of BIM Implementation, Cabinet Office, provided an overview of how information modelling has progressed From the early use of Computer Aided design (CAD) to the present day, the use and integration of BIM and other new digital technologies are necessary vehicles to move towards Construction 2025. As we enter the era of virtualisation and the sensor-rich ‘internet of things’, substantial levels of data being produced are allowing decisions to be made based on user needs, requirements and habits. Moving towards BIM level 3, and using data for design and management of buildings and assets will be instrumental in driving efficiency, a key target within Construction 2025. Developing the UK as a leader in its use, this expertise can be exported abroad and contribute to improvements in exports. In such cases openness towards collaborative working is of increasing importance to all involved, as the opportunities to achieve mutual benefits are becoming apparent. Recent developments and new procurement models John Boultwood, Director of Contract Services, Turner and Townsend, presented key aspects of the commitment to Construction 2025 relating to procurement, namely to show improved efficiency One recent development was to focus not just on the initial capital investment cost but the whole life costs which are important to the client who ultimately pays for the total expenditure or TOTEX. This is not a new or radical approach but was often difficult to implement because of the nature of certain types of procurement approach and the limits of responsibility for each contracting organisation at each stage. Other recent developments presented to deliver success included a project initiation routemap https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/improving-infrastructure-delivery-project- initiation-routemap, and a government framework document to support public and private sector infrastructure providers improve the delivery of their projects and programmes. The Routemap process looks at the complexity of a particular project, and then provides a way of assessing capability of the project stakeholders, for example the client, the market and the asset manager to organise for an effective and efficient delivery of a project. The third stage is to ‘align for success’ and where capability gaps exist the Routemap provides a structured basis of improvement to enhance the capability of the parties to deliver the project successfully. Efficiency in the construction industry is also about demonstrating ‘the pipeline of work’ to enable better supply chain planning in the long-term and move away from the stop-start nature of construction work. INFRASTRUCTURE


evolutionSummer2015
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